Every Kid is One Caring Adult Away From Being a Success Story

Should You Give Your Parents Another Chance?

The thought of giving your parents another chance can be hard to consider—especially if you’re angry about something.

It seems like the answer is obvious, right? Why should you give your parents another chance? They’re the authority figures.

They’re supposed to set the example.

Since when did this fall on your shoulders?

Here’s the thing: Nobody’s perfect.

Not you, not your parents, certainly not me. Why? Because everybody has a story.

For instance, my parents left me, and I went through many foster families until I finally found some steady ground.

This isn’t a pity party or anything. It’s just my way of saying that sometimes things happen to you that hurt, and that you know you don’t deserve. And sometimes these things comes from the people you least expect—like your parents.

But you have an option: You can choose to get bitter or you can choose to get better.

Sure, your parents have that option, too. But you can’t control what they do or how they react.

You’re only in control of you.

So, the answer to the big question above is “yes.” And to help you out, here’s some practical advice on how to make it happen. It won’t be easy, but it will be worth it.

WATCH: Give Your Parents Another Chance

Just like us, our parents’ actions are a result of their story—be it how they were raised or something frustrating that happened earlier in the day.

According to Psychology Today “Some parents and teens who engage in frequent arguments have, by these measures, a good relationship: what matters is that a quarrel doesn’t end with two people simply brooding over their own anger.”

Here’s your challenge:

Start a conversation. Now.

I’ve given you a deadline of 8 hours and 23 minutes to do something to make your relationship with your parents better.

It’s your choice about how to make it happen. You can sit down across from them and talk it out, pick up the phone and just tell your parents you love them, or write a letter about how you think you can improve your relationship. Tell them how you feel, ask them how they feel, and most importantly, open the door for communication.

If you’re feeling stuck, use one of these prompts to get you going:

“Mom, I’m sorry. I’ve never considered your side…”

“Hey dad, can we talk about why we argue a lot?”

“I just wanted to say, when you did  ___, I felt ___. Can we talk about this”

This might be a gradual process, and it’s not going to be perfect. Relationships aren’t perfect because people aren’t perfect. But no matter how hard things might seem sometimes, don’t forget that you always have the power to make it better.

You have 8 hours and 22 minutes left. Go do it.

 

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